Quality Pheromones & Trapping Systems

Click on the Insect Name Below to Learn More

Almond Moth Angoumois Grain Moth Black Carpet Beetle
Casemaking Clothes Moth Cigarette Beetle Fruit Flies
Hide Beetle Indianmeal Moth Larger Grain Borer
Lesser Grain Borer Mediterranean Flour Moth Red & Confused Flour Beetle
Rice & Maize Weevil Saw-Toothed Grain Beetle Tobacco Moth
Varied Carpet Beetle Warehouse Beetle  Webbing Clothes Moth

Almond Moth (Ephestia cautella)
Almond MothThis moth looks like a dirty or hazy version of an Indianmeal Moth or a different colored Mediterranean Flour Moth. It has a 14 - 20 mm wing span.

Food
: This moth will feed on most dried food goods as
as well as nuts, seeds and grains of all types and dried fruit.


Life Cycle:
Females lay about 114 eggs in and around potential food sources. The eggs hatch in 4 to 8 days. The larval period lasts about 64 days depending on the environment. The entire life cycle occurs in ~ 82 days.

Trap use and placement: The male Almond Moth is extremely attracted to the pheromone Bullet Lures. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where food sources are stored. Traps can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves or within drawers. 

 

Angoumois Grain Moth (Sitotroga cerealella)
Angoumois Grain MothThis cosmopolitan moth was first discovered eating sound grains in the French province Angoumois, giving it, it's name. Much different than most other stored food moths because it is an internal feeder of grain kernels. The larvae will bore a hole into the grain and seal up the hole with a silken web. The tips of the wings have a feathered appearance.

Food
: Prefers damp grain, whole sound kernels of barley, rye, corn, oats, wheat, rice and whole grain seeds.

Life Cycle:
Females lay 40 to 300 eggs in and around whole grains and seeds. It will continue to remain active at relatively low temperatures.

Trap use and placement: The male Angoumois Moth is extremely attracted to the pheromone Bullet Lures. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where food sources are stored. Traps can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves or within drawers. 

Angoumois Grain Moth Larva in Corn

Black Carpet Beetle (Attagenus spp.)
The adult is 2.8 - 5 mm in length. It is mostly dark brown to black in color. The larvae is long and carrot shaped with a tuft of hairs emerging from the rear end.

Food:
The larvae of this pest will feed upon a great variety of animal and plant products, such as carpets, felt, woolen goods, skins, furs, stuffed animals, leather book bindings, feathers, horns, hair, silk, cattle hair, and insect meal. Also it will attack plant products such as seeds and grains, corn and cayenne peppers. Specifically in museums, it will attack insect and ethnographic collections.

Life Cycle: The female Black Carpet Beetle will lay 42 - 114 eggs near a possible food source. The larval stage is the destructive stage. The period from egg to adult will last about 1 year, possibly more depending on environment.

Trap use and placement: Pheromone lures are available for this pest to attract the male of the species. They are good fliers, so any hanging sticky trap with a fresh pheromone lure will work. Hang the traps so that you can easily inspect them. Outdoor species are attracted to light.

 

Casemaking Clothes Moth(Tinea pellionella)Case-making Clothes Moth Adult
If you have clothes moths and it's not the Webbing Clothes Moth, chances are you have Case-making Clothes Moths.  Materials left undisturbed for some time or stored in dark places (such as a closet, attic, or drawer) are most severely injured by these insects. The adults are slightly smaller than the Webbing Clothes Moth. Body and wings are colored buff to golden with a brownish tinge, except for three dark spots on the front wings. The eyes are wider than the space between them. The brown headed larvae will spin a silken case that it carries around with them as they feed.

Food: Clothing moth larvae feed on wool, hair, feathers, furs, upholstered furniture, occasionally on dead insects, dry dead animals, animal and fish meals, milk powders such as casein, and nearly all animal products such as bristles, dried hair and leather. Adults do not eat.
Case-making Clothes Moth Larvae
Life Cycle: 33 - 48 days, depending on environment.  Adult moths lay 100-150 eggs. The larvae is the damaging stage. They are white with brown heads and vary in size from 1/4" when first hatched up to 1/3" when full grown. The length of the larval period depends largely on the environmental conditions and the quality of food. 

Trap use and placement: This trap is placed on the floor indoors in closets and rooms where woolen, silk fabrics, furs, or items with feathers are stored. One trap per closet or storage room can attract and catch the male moths. This trap will act as an early warning tool to help prevent destruction of woolen items and other fabrics.

Cigarette Beetle(Lasioderma serricorne) 
Cigarette BeetleThis destructive insect is a serious pest of dried plant material. It can also cause serious damage to books. The Cigarette beetle is a small brown beetle measuring 2-3 mm in length. The Cigarette beetle is closely related to the Drugstore beetle which can cause difficulty in identification. However, with some training they can be distinguished easily. The Cigarette beetle has wings covered in small hairs whereas the Drugstore beetle's wings have rows of punctations.

Food: This beetle feeds on a great diversity of edible and non edible products. They may infest stored food products such as spices, rice, dry pet foods, as well as seeds, pharmaceuticals, and books among many other materials. It is especially important as a pest of tobacco products.

Life Cycle: Females lay the eggs in the larval food and hatch in 6 to 10 days. The larval period lasts 5 to 10 weeks. The pupal period lasts 2 to 3 weeks. The entire life cycle takes about 10 to 12 weeks. Adults live up to a month.

Trap use and placement: There are three trap designs available for this beetle. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where foods are stored, while the Serrico trap and Tobacco Beetle Trap can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves with stored food or on the floor in these areas. These traps should be protected from sunlight and wind during use.

Fruit Flies (Drosophila spp.)
Fruit FlyThe adult is 3 mm in length including the wings. It has bright red eyes with a tan colored head and thorax. The abdomen in black from above and grayish on the underside. The adults are light attracted.

Food: Rotting bananas, pineapples, tomatoes, potatoes and numerous other fruits and vegetables. Fermenting liquids, such as wine, cider, vinegar, beer and the liquids left behind in soda cans in re-cycling bins and trash cans.

Life Cycle:
The entire life cycle can take place in as few as eight days.

Trap use and placement: Place traps near trash cans and food storage areas.

 

Hide Beetle (Dermestes maculatus)
The adult is 5 - 10 mm in length. The dorsal side of its body is all black, while the underside is mostly white.

Food:
Hide beetle will feed on carcasses of stored skins and hides. It can be a pest of museums, ham, cheese meats, pigs ears and other high protein items.

Life Cycle:
The female Hide Beetle will lay more than 500 eggs in her lifetime. She will lay them individually or in batches of 20 or so. The eggs will be laid right on the food source. Egg to adult in a minimum of 70 days. They can live for more than 1 year. The adults can fly.

Trap use and placement: Flat traps or Trapper monitors work well for this beetle and larvae.

Indianmeal Moth (Plodia interpunctella)
Plodia interpuctella, Indianmeal MothThis is one of the easiest stored food insects to identify because the adults have a colorful appearance and the larvae (which look like yellow or green worms) leave a silken webbing trail wherever they crawl. Newly emerged adults have bi-colored (copper and tan) wings and measure about 1/2" from top to bottom.

Food
: This pesky moth will feed on most dried food goods as
as well as seeds and grains of all types.


Life Cycle:
Females lay about 200 - 400 eggs in and around potential food sources. The eggs hatch in 6 to 10 days. The larval period lasts from 13 to 288 days depending on the environment. The entire life cycle occurs in 5 - 40 weeks.

Trap use and placement: The male Indianmeal Moth is extremely attracted to the pheromone Bullet Lures and Moth Suppression Lures. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where food sources are stored. Traps can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves or within drawers. Females looking to lay eggs will be attracted to the Moth Suppression Lure.

Indianmal Moth Larva

 

Lesser Grain Borer & Larger Grain Borer (Rhizopertha dominica & Prostephanus truncatus)
These beetles of the Bostrichid family are both important pests of stored grains. The adults are very similar to each other with the Larger Grain Borer being 4mm in length and the Lesser Grain Borer being 3mm in length. The eggs are laid loosely in the grain or in cracks in grain. The larvae will usually bore into the grain. The adults will also bore into the grain to feed leaving only a thin shell behind. They are good fliers as adults.

Food:
These beetles will feed on most stored grains and have been known to damage books and wood.

Life Cycle:
Females will lay up to 500 eggs in her lifetime. She will lay them singly or in clusters from 2 - 30. Average time from egg to adult is 58 days (Potter). 


Trap use and placement:
The use of pheromone lures in a sticky trap should work well when placed within 15 feet or 4.5 meters of infested product. Grain probe traps directly in the grain mass will also capture these beetles for monitoring purposes.

 

Mediterranean Flour Moth (Ephestia kuehniella)Mediterranean Flour Moth
Mediterranean Flour Moths adults are much darker than the common Indianmeal Moth and the larvae are whitish or pinkish and leave a silken webbing trail wherever they crawl. Newly emerged adults measure about 1/2" from top to bottom.
Food: This moth will feed on most dried food goods including flour as as well as nuts, seeds and grains of all types.
Life Cycle: Females lay about 116 - 678 eggs in and around potential food sources. The eggs hatch in 3 to 10 days. The larval period lasts 40 days in optimum conditions of 80 - 90 degrees F or 26 - 29 degrees C. 

Trap use and placement: The male Mediterranean Flour Moth is extremely attracted to the pheromone Bullet Lures and Moth Suppression Lures. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where food sources are stored. Traps can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves or within drawers.

 

Red Flour Beetle (Tribolium castaneum)
Confused Flour Beetle (Tribolium confusum)
Red Flour Beetle
These beetles, also called bran bugs, are common pests of flour. They may infest any product made with grain, but they cannot infest sound (undamaged) grain. Flour beetles require about a month to complete their life cycle. Adults may live up to three years. The Red Flour Beetle can fly, whereas the Confused Flour Beetle cannot.


Food: Flour and damaged grain and many other dried foods.

Life Cycle: Females lay 2 - 3 eggs at a time into the food product that they infest. Confused Flour Beetle females will lay eggs over an eight month period, where Red Flour Beetle will lay eggs over a 51/2 month period. 300 - 400 total eggs are laid over their lifetime. 

Trap use and placement: These beetles will rarely fly into traps. Traps must be placed on the floor indoors in pantries and storage rooms where flour or grain products are stored. One trap per closet or storage room can attract and catch the beetles. The Pantry Patrol Gel Bait acts as a food attractant and aggregation pheromone attractant for males and females. These beetles will only travel short distances to come to the traps. E.G. 5 - 10 feet.

 

Rice Weevil & Maize Weevil (Sitophilus oryzae & Sitophilus zeamais)
These beetles are both important pests of whole grains and pasta. The adults are distinguished by the the long snout (proboscis) which is used to bore holes into grain kernels. The eggs are then laid inside the kernel and the hole is sealed over as the ovipositor is removed. The larvae will hollow out the kernel of grain as it grows, leaving only a thin shell. The adults are good flyers.

Food:
These beetles will feed on rye, buckwheat, table beans, corn and wheat products as well as pasta.

Life Cycle:
Females will lay up to 25 eggs per day over a 100 day period. Larvae and pupae will remain inside the grain for up to 30 days on average. 


Trap use and placement:
The use of the pheromone lure in combination with a food attractant in a pitfall trap seems to work well for these pests.

 

Saw-Toothed Grain Beetle (Oryzaephilus surinamensis)
Merchant Grain Beetle (Oryzaephilus mercator)
These beetles, which look almost identical, are common pests of stored food product. Their flat and sleek design allow them to penetrate most types of food packaging.

Adult: This active brown beetle is only 1/10th of an inch (2.5mm) in length. The thorax has a distinct saw-toothed pattern on either side. Although they have wings, they have never been seen to fly.

Food: Cereals, dried fruits, breakfast foods, chocolate, bran, rice, oat and many other foodstuffs.

Life Cycle: The complete life cycle can be as short as 30 days.  

Trap use and placement: Traps must be placed on the floor indoors in pantries and storage rooms where food products are stored. One trap per closet or storage room can attract and catch the beetles. The pitfall trap design works best for these strong climbing beetles.

Tobacco Moth (Ephestia elutella)
Tobacco MothThis cosmopolitan moth is a light grayish brown with two light bands extending across each forewing. It is similar in size to the Mediterranean Flour Moth.

Food
: This moth will feed on tobacco, chocolate, cereals and seeds.

Life Cycle:
Females lay eggs in and around potential food sources. 

Trap use and placement: The male Tobacco Moth is extremely attracted to the pheromone Bullet Lures. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where food sources are stored. Traps can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves or within drawers. 

Varied Carpet Beetle (Anthrenus verbasci)
Varied Carpet BeetleThe adult is 2 - 3 mm in length. The dorsal side of its body is for the most part blackish in the center, with a variable , irregular arrangement of white, brownish, and yellowish scales.

Food:
The larvae of this pest will feed upon a great variety of animal and plant products, such as carpets, woolen goods, skins, furs, stuffed animals, leather book bindings, feathers, horns, whalebone, hair, silk, fish manure, and dried silk worm pupae. Also it will attack plant products such as rye meal, cacao, corn and red pepper. Specifically in museums, it will attack insect and ethnographic collections.

Life Cycle: The female Varied Carpet Beetle will lay her eggs near a possible food source. The larval stage is the destructive stage. The period from egg to adult will last about 1 year, possibly more depending on environment.

Trap use and placement: Pheromone lures are available for this pest to attract the male of the species. They are good fliers, so any hanging sticky trap with a fresh pheromone lure will work. Hang the traps so that you can easily inspect them. Outdoor species are attracted to light.

 

Warehouse Beetle (Trogoderma spp.)Trogoderma
This small, oval beetle is a common pest of many types of artifacts. The adult is a tiny black beetle with white or lightly colored markings on its back. The larvae are orange-brown in color and look hairy. Warehouse beetles feed primarily on animal products, but will readily feed on grain and cereal products. The hairs of the larvae can cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals especially when swallowed.

Food:
This beetle is a voracious feeder and will feed on a wide variety of items including: seeds, dead animals, cereals, corn, corn meal, nut meats, dried vegetables and plant material and fish meal.

Life Cycle:
The life cycle from egg to adult can be completed in 43 days, but they can stay in diapause (hibernation) for up to two years.


Trap use and placement:
The male Warehouse Beetle is extremely attracted to the pheromone Bullet Lures. No Survivor traps are hung in areas where botanicals are stored. Traps can be hung along a wall or placed on shelves or within drawers where herbarium storage takes place.


Webbing Clothes Moth
(Tineola bisselliella)
Webbing Clothes MothWith the decreased use of preventive pesticides, the incidence of museum items damaged by the Webbing Clothes moth has increased significantly in recent years. Items primarily affected include woolens, anything containing feathers, animal mounts and skeletons. Woolen items injured by clothes moths have holes eaten through them by small, white larvae. You can often find hairs falling from animal specimens that the larvae are feeding upon. Materials left undisturbed for some time or stored in dark places (such as a closet, attic, or drawer) are most severely injured by these insects. The adults are small and champagne-colored. They can often be seen running over the surface of the infested goods when exposed to light or flying somewhat aimlessly about the houses or closets.

Food: Clothing moth larvae feed on wool, hair, feathers, furs, upholstered furniture, occasionally on dead insects, dry dead animals, animal and fish meals, milk powders such as casein, and nearly all animal products such as bristles, dried hair and leather. Adults do not eat.

Life Cycle: Adult moths lay 100-150 eggs. The larvae is the damaging stage. They are white and vary in size from 1/16" when first hatched up to 1/3" when full grown. The length of the larval period depends largely on the environmental conditions and the quality of food.
Pheromone traps in a museum

Trap use and placement: This trap is placed on the floor indoors in closets and rooms where woolen, silk fabrics, furs, or items with feathers are stored. One trap per closet or storage room can attract and catch the male moths. This trap will act as an early warning tool to help prevent destruction of woolen items and other fabrics.

 

 

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